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Author Archive

Chickies

2.Jul.2014 by Caitlin Patterson

This is the second year we’ve had chickens at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, raised by the GRP for their eggs.  Most athletes are known for eating rather large quantities of eggs, an easy and tasty source of protein, but not everyone is as intimately involved in the egg-making process as we are here.  For quite a few people, especially in rural VT like we are, raising chickens isn’t particularly unusual; however I know that not everyone is lucky enough to have the facilities to raise chickens, and to know so conclusively where their eggs come from.

New this year, the chickens are in residence in a field at Elinor’s, the skier house.  I can’t say I saw much of the chickens last year, when they lived near one of the rower houses, but I’m getting well acquainted with this year’s chickens as one of their caretakers. It’s fun, I like chickens! They’re pretty silly, sometimes annoying, often voraciously hungry and thirsty, but friendly and talk(sqawk)ative.  And softly feathery – I’ve been trying to help them acclimate to people, which will make them easier to be around and handle, so I pet them every day! Don’t worry, you can laugh, my teammates have been laughing and giving me a hard time about petting the chickens too…

Posing with a chicken post-workout.  Thanks to Andrew for the photo, and for coercing me into posing for it.

Posing with a chicken, post-workout. Thanks to Andrew for the photo, and for coercing me into posing for it.

Alex Howe, who’s had significant experience with animals and crops at his family’s farm, and a few other of the athletes got the chicken coop all set up last year.  That was the hard part of the process – the feeding, watering, and daily egg collecting is pretty straightforward.  The coop is right next to the ski trails and the main route between our house and the Center, so I can check on them as I run or bike past for workouts and commutes to the Center.  As long as I keep them well supplied with water and food, the chickens are pretty content and the number of eggs keeps going up.  Right now we’re getting 42-48 eggs a day, which should go up to closer to 65 soon, equal to the number of chickens.

The chickens are always eager to see me walking up to their coop, and they gather inside the solar-powered electric fence expectantly.  One of my favorite parts of the process right now is walking up to the chicken coop at twilight to shut them inside for the night – the fireflies are out in great numbers, adding their sparkle to the fields, and the chickens are softly clucking and settling down for the night.

 

Looking back towards Elinor's from the coop

Looking back towards Elinor’s from the coop

Gathered at the water dish

Chickens excited at fresh water and an empty bucket, with the solar electric fence in the background

Waiting inside the fence

Waiting inside the fence

I bring the chickens fresh water a few times a day, especially if it's hot like the current heat wave

I bring the chickens fresh water a few times a day, especially if it’s hot like the current heat wave

Entrance to the coop

Entrance to the coop

Inside the coop, with food buckets

Inside the coop, with food buckets

Egg boxes

Egg boxes

Eggs!

Eggs!

The day's collection

The day’s collection

Chicken feed + water + happy chickens + VT grassy pasture + attentive caretaker  = tasty eggs!

Chicken feed + water + happy chickens + VT grassy pasture + attentive caretaker = tasty eggs!

Once the eggs are in the kitchen, more fun begins, as we turn them into breakfasts, or snacks.  I have pictures of a few egg-creations, but not nearly all of them, because it’s often hard to remember to take pictures before something is devoured, by myself or others.  We eat lunch and dinner at the Outdoor Center dining hall, but breakfast at Elinor’s is a good opportunity to cook whatever we’d like. Recent favorites include: fried eggs on toast with jam and melted cheddar cheese (several of my skier teammates eat this often, and it’s great! I hadn’t tried the combo until a few weeks ago and it’s now solidly in my repertoire of breakfast options – highly recommended!), scrambled eggs, waffles, egg-banana pancakes and more.  A few nights ago we had an evening gathering and invited the rowers to our house, and I made deviled eggs for a snack.

Eggs, ready for consumption

Eggs, ready for consumption

Big eggs and little eggs, choose your portion

Big eggs and little eggs, choose your portion

Have you ever heard of egg-banana pancakes? I discovered them this spring and now I make them about once a week.  1 mashed banana, 2-3 eggs, dash of vanilla, dash of cinnamon -- yum!

Have you ever heard of egg-banana pancakes? I discovered them this spring and now I make them about once a week. 1 mashed banana, 2-3 eggs, dash of vanilla, dash of cinnamon yields a crepe-like not-too-sweet pancake ideal for topping with berries or peanut butter, and syrup.

Egg and banana pancake operation in progress, with blueberries, peaches, yogurt and VT maple syrup of course!

Egg and banana pancake operation in progress, with blueberries, peaches, yogurt and VT maple syrup of course!

Deviled eggs, garnished with paprika and chives.

Deviled eggs, garnished with paprika and chives.

Fueled by all of these nutritious eggs, and the rest of the fabulous food at the COC dining hall, we skiers are deep into summer training, with lots of running, rollerskiing, strength, etc.

One token training photo - track speeds a few weeks ago with the girls' team.  Left to right, Ida, Liz, Caitlin, Kaitlynn. More training photos coming soon, hopefully...

One token training photo – track speeds a few weeks ago with the girls’ team.  Left to right, Ida, Liz, Caitlin, Kaitlynn. More training photos coming soon, hopefully…

Spring skiing in the Arctic: NANANordic summary

7.May.2014 by Caitlin Patterson

NANANordic is an amazing program that brings skiing to remote villages in Alaska, with volunteer coaches from among the ranks of elite athletes, coaches from all levels, and essentially anyone who skis and wants to share their passion for the sport.  Last year I visited the village of Selawik, and based on the positive experiences I had there, I decided to sign up for a 2-village segment this year.  It’s exhausting, often trying, and very-little-down-time experience, but completely worth it for the chance to share skiing with so many enthusiastic young people and bring them outside to play on the snow.  I also find that the outlook of being a coach – being the one in charge, who people come to with problems, or who the 5-year-olds want to hold the hand of when they’re scared of the downhills – is a refreshing change in perspective after being the “athlete” all year.

To start the trip, I flew from Anchorage to Kotzebue, spent a few hours in Kotzebue, and then continued on a small airplane to Noatak.  See the map below for the location of Noatak and Kivalina.

regionmap

Noatak is inland, surrounded by lakes and small rivers, with a population of 514.  The school principal picked us up at the airstrip, drove us to the school, and showed us our accommodations for the next 5 days – the Napaaqtugmiut school library! We spent the afternoon organizing equipment, and then took an evening loop around town on skis to check out our surroundings and figure out where we’d be taking the kids to ski the next day.

I’m going to try not to swamp this post with too many photos, but here are a few.  (Additional photos from my trip can be found at my just-released personal blog www.caitlinpatterson.blogspot.com.)

My fellow coaches in Noatak, from left Libby, Sam, and Tyler

My fellow coaches in Noatak, from left Libby, Sam, and Tyler

Expectant skiers, with basketball in the background

Expectant skiers, with basketball in the background

Coach Libby playing games with kindergarteners

Coach Libby playing games with kindergarteners

Coaches Tyler and Sam pulling trains of kids

Coaches Tyler and Sam pulling trains of kids

Tyler was a favorite playmate when we walked around the village one evening

Tyler was a favorite playmate when we walked around the village one evening

The following morning, after a brief scheduling meeting with the teachers, it was time to ski! Each class rotated through to ski once during the day, from kindergarten to high school, and we usually had two classes at once, sometimes such diverse groups as 1st graders with 11th graders.  The older students are actually great with helping the little ones, plus they could go off on longer skis with their teachers or play games. On one of the last days all of us coaches played basketball on skis with some of the high-schoolers and it was extremely fun – the high-schoolers playing had gotten good enough at skiing, and they’re extremely good at basketball, so that the coaches could go all-out and not hold back any speed or agility during the game.  Needless to say we were pretty tired after 45 minutes of intense games…

Each day we skied with the kids for anywhere between 4 and 8 hours, and on a few of the mornings a few of us coaches went for pre-sunrise crust skis too.  The kids of all ages were great, and our most difficult times during the day were always when it was time to get everyone back inside, because they wanted to keep skiing!

Looking back at the school on a pre-sunrise ski

Looking back at the school on a pre-sunrise ski

Arctic light before sunrise

Arctic light before sunrise

Sketchy bridge, which Tyler and I had to cross for one of the pre-sunrise crust skis

Sketchy bridge, which Tyler and I had to cross for one of the pre-sunrise crust skis

Happy faces after skiing!

Happy faces after skiing!

Tyler and the girls

Tyler and the girls

A group of very proficient skiers by the last day in Noatak

A group of very proficient skiers by the last day in Noatak

After 5 days in Noatak, when our coaching there wrapped up, a group of three of us – Sam, Marcus, and myself – chose to ski from Noatak to Kivalina.  The ski was 50 miles along a snow-machine trail between the villages, which is called the “stake trail” because of the wooden stakes posted every 50-100 feet marking the route.  Marcus chose to take the trip through an NNF auction and he was a great addition to our group for coaching the kids as well as our village-to-village ski.  The ski started off with gradually rolling terrain, soon becoming larger hills as we climbed up towards a pass over low hills (by Alaska standards, hardly even a pass, in not-really-mountains).  From mile 20 through 45, the terrain was close to entirely flat, with very gently rolling hills of tundra grasses.  The last few miles were along riverbanks and over a frozen marshland to the peninsula where the village of Kivalina is built.  While the first half of the ski had good snow coverage, the 2nd half involved some pretty low snow, including one short section where we just walked across the grass on our skis, and many miles of stepping around grass tussocks, unavoidable agility training.  Luckily the weather was fairly mild, other than a bit of wind on the higher terrain, and it was sunny and nice all day.  We carried all of our own food and water, and did not have any snowmachine support, which is not exactly ideal, but the person we had hoped could follow us was not available that day.

The most memorable experience of the ski involved a bit of a mix-up with the GPS distance measurements from Marcus’s watch.  We knew we had about 50 miles, which is 80 kilometers, to ski.  Throughout most of the ski it seemed like we were making slow progress, and after 5 hours of skiing, the watch told us we had reached 40 kilometers (we believed), so the halfway point. We tried to keep our outlooks positive, but 5 more hours of skiing sounded brutal, having calculated before leaving that it ought to take 7-8 hours to ski the trail.  A little while further along, we saw a plane landing in the distance, which gave us a spark of hope, and then about 30 minutes of skiing later, we could just make out a few buildings on the horizon.  Kivalina!  And thus Marcus realized that his watch distance units must have been in miles, not kilometers, so at the 40 mark we had been 4/5ths of the way through our ski instead of half. You have no idea how easy a 7 hr 20 minute ski (start to stop, including short breaks) feels after believing from about hour 4 through hour 6 that it would be a 10-11 hr day!

Starting the ski at 6:30am meant that we were out in time to see the sunrise

Starting the ski at 6:30am meant that we were out in time to see the sunrise

Marcus (left) and Sam climbing towards the pass on our 50 mile ski

Marcus (left) and Sam climbing towards the pass on our 50 mile ski

Kivalina was my next village for coach-volunteering, so after the long ski I stayed in Kivalina for another 6 days and met another set of awesome young skiers.  Kivalina was in the mainstream news a few years ago because it is a village that is at risk from rising sea levels, and there is a relocation project under study.  It’s a small town of 374 people, and the entire town is built compactly on a small section of a spit on the edge of the ocean.  The first 24 hours in Kivalina we had some down time to recover, as we waited for the rest of the Kivalina coaches to arrive.  It was Easter weekend, and the community of Kivalina welcomed many visitors to join their Easter celebrations, which included “singspirations”, church services, and community meals and pot-lucks.  We visited the community center and joined several of the meals, in which our hosts supplied us with muktuk (uncooked whale blubber) to try, as well as delicious caribou stew, cranberry sauce, and several more mainstream foods like potato salad and chicken soup.  An elder by the name of Joe regaled us with whaling stories during one of the meals, and then our coaching group was lucky enough to be able to watch two whaling boats getting launched later in the week.

Everyone was extremely friendly and inviting, and the kids especially in Kivalina loved to climb all over us, hold hands while skiing, watch Reese Hanneman and anyone else doing tricks, and have us watch them skiing down the hills or trying tricks.

Waiting for the first ski session in Kivalina

Waiting for the first ski session in Kivalina

This fast group made it all the way to the river one day after school, a considerable ski

This fast group made it all the way to the river one day after school, a considerable ski

"Junior" preferred to play on the slide rather than let me help him ski, but he wanted to wear those ski boots!

“Junior” preferred to play on the slide rather than let me help him ski, but he wanted to wear those ski boots!

Skiers heading back towards Kivalina

Skiers heading back towards Kivalina

Playing on a hill next to the runway

Playing on a hill next to the runway

Coach Megan dumping colored pins to get ready for the next round of "biathlon" games

Coach Megan dumping colored pins to get ready for the next round of “biathlon” games

Reese watching the whalers prepare to launch, after helping them push the boat off the ice into the water.

Reese watching the whalers prepare to launch, after helping them push the boat off the ice into the water.

Me and my friend Geraine "Rainey"

Me and my friend Geraine “Rainey”

Rainey taking a break from skiing

Rainey taking a break from skiing

Katie and one of the kids making faces!

Katie and one of the kids making faces!

Lily borrowed my phone to take pictures while skiing

Lily borrowed my phone to take pictures while skiing

Shannon, Lena, and Tasha demonstrating one of the Alaska Native pulling games played in the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics

Shannon, Lena, and Tasha demonstrating one of the Alaska Native pulling games played in the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics

Coach Reese and an elementary class after they delivered thank-you cards to us on the last day

Coach Reese and an elementary class after they delivered thank-you cards to us on the last day

These trips are experiences I’ll never forget, and I’m very happy to have had the opportunity to share my enthusiasm for skiing with so many inspiring kids and to take a little peak at life in the Arctic.

Nordic Cross at Cochran’s

13.Mar.2014 by Caitlin Patterson

Our team’s skiers and biathletes were involved in all sorts of races this past weekend, in Norway, Slovenia and here in Vermont.  On Sunday March 9th, a particularly unusual race was held at Cochran’s Ski Area in Richmond, VT – a Nordic Cross race! I heard about the race a few weeks ago and decided that I simply had to go compete, it sounded like too much fun to miss, even though I didn’t really know what it would entail.  Race description: “Uphill, downhill, slalom gates, jumps, and obstacles, all on one pair of skis” – sign me up!  I tried to get my GRP teammates to join me for the race, but everyone had something else to do, apparently…  Luckily Callie, Jack, and Quincy, some of our Craftsbury BKL/junior skiers, also were at the race, so I had company representing Craftsbury in the green suit – we all finished on the podiums of our age groups too!

Jack, Callie, and Caitlin

Jack, Callie, and Caitlin

Cochran’s is a small family-run alpine mountain, and they did an absolutely fantastic job of setting up this race, with a creative and challenging course, prizes for age group top 3, and a pancake feed after the race.  Nordic cross isn’t exactly a standardized race type, in fact this was probably the first one ever in New England.  For this event though, heats of 5 people left the start each minute on cross country skis, so the skiers were racing the clock for overall placing (but of course racing the people in their heat also).

The course had all the advertised components to provide everyone with plenty of a challenge.  The adult course started at the top of Cochran’s, and included: about 6 definitive steep uphill segments as well as a working gradual uphill, many downhills with a variety of gates from slalom to farther apart GS-type gates, some small jumps as well as a few larger jumps, a drop, banked corners, ungroomed sections through the woods, and carved-out bumps on the groomed area.  The path of the course was marked throughout with spray paint guide-lines and arrows, which was crucial for figuring out where to turn next.  An added challenge was the iciness of the hill, which hadn’t softened much in the sun by the start – the first morning of daylight savings, combined with cold temperatures overnight, meant that quite a bit of the hill was a sheet of ice underneath a little bit of softer groomed snow.  So of course it was scraped down to that ice on all of the corners, leading to even more skidding and lack of traction on our metal-edge-less cross country skis.  It’s safe to say that EVERYONE racing snowplowed and skidded the corners, it was just a matter of how much snowplowing could be avoided to pick up a little extra time.

The winning men’s time was 9:32 (Eli Enman), and I was the first women with a time of 10:53, 12th overall.  (Results: http://www.cochranskiarea.com/images/pdf/rank2.pdf) My heat included 3 men and 2 women so it was a great challenge to stay ahead of a few of the guys.  Kids 12 and under did a shorter version of the course, starting lower on the hill, and they were completing their course in as little as 6 minutes. The race was really well attended for a first-time event – several dozen kids raced and 118 adults, including some skiers who had been at JNs in Stowe this past week, various high school and college students, masters and citizen’s racers, ski coaches, and at least one “professional ski racer” (that would be me!).

Women's 20-29 podium, with great prizes from Slopeside Syrup, Skida, EMS, Lake Champlain Chocolate and others

Women’s 20-29 podium, with great prizes from Slopeside Syrup, Skida, EMS, Lake Champlain Chocolate and others

It was a serious adrenaline rush, kind of scary, and also awesome and exactly what I was looking for!  There’s nothing better than this type of event to reinvigorate for the last bit of the season, to remember how cool skiing is and how much fun it is to be able to go off jumps and take sketchy turns on ice, and to burn the lungs with a few uphill sprints.  Yes, in my future races I may be wishing for jumps, but I truly love racing uphill too, so I know I’m in the right sport, Nordic cross was just a great diversion for the day!  Pictures don’t really do the event justice in terms of the intensity of the course, but here are a few from the day.  Thanks to Meredith Young for many of these pictures.  And thanks to Cochran’s for hosting an amazing event!!

From the base - the race finished going up the right side corridor of fencing up to about the top of the red fence

From the base – the race finished going up the right side corridor of fencing up to about the top of the red fence

Riding the T-bar to the top to preview the course.  Before the race start the t-bar was temporarily stopped so most of us just skied up.

Riding the T-bar to the top to preview the course. Before the race start the t-bar was temporarily stopped so most of us just skied up.

View from near the top, with the course zig-zagging down the mountain

View from near the top, with the course zig-zagging down the mountain

Backwards through these gates

Backwards through these gates

Follow the orange spray paint

Follow the orange spray paint

Kids racers gathering for the start

Kids racers gathering for the start

Racers gather for the start at the top of Cochran's

Racers waiting for start instructions at the top of Cochran’s

Callie, in the green Craftsbury tights, leading around a gate

Callie, in the green Craftsbury tights, leading around a gate. Callie won the women’s 13-15 age group.

Racers criss-crossing the slope during the race.

Racers criss-crossing the slope during the race.

Catching air off a little jump during the race!

Catching air off a little jump!

The pancake station

The pancake station. These women were cooking amazing pancakes for hours to feed all the racers and spectators.

Blueberry pancakes on the griddle

Blueberry pancakes on the griddle

Jack devouring his pancakes!  Jack was 2nd place in his age group of 11-12 year olds.

Jack devouring his pancakes! Jack was 2nd place in his age group of 11-12 year olds.

Waiting for awards

Waiting for awards

 

Rollercoaster Nationals

20.Jan.2014 by Caitlin Patterson

The skiing GRP recently returned from a racing trip to Soldier Hollow, Utah, where we competed in the four races of US Nationals. The races were a 10/15k classic, skate sprint, 20/30k skate mass start, and a classic sprint, in that order spread out over the course of seven days.

Nationals is always an interesting experience, with individual high expectations colliding with an increase in the number and intensity of competitors present at the races.  Especially in an Olympic year, tensions are extra high.  While doing well at Nationals does not directly correspond to Olympic selection, the races potentially have an effect, especially for the men this year.

When I was in college, the races of US Nationals were usually among the first times I really competed for the season.  Especially with Nationals at the upcoming 2014 NCAA venue, and with the distance races as Western college scoring races, there were quite a few college skiers present, and I can sympathize with the difficulty of their position, being thrown into a gigantic field of racers in what could have been between their first and fifth race start of the year.  Many of the college skiers raced very well though, and it was great to have them in the mix with the rest of us professional athletes and the multitude of junior skiers.

For those of us who’ve been racing the US Supertour, we’ve had a chance to adjust to racing and smooth out our routines somewhat, hypothetically.  The first race of Nationals was my 8th race start, and it was nice to be fairly comfortable with my pre-race routine and be able to fine-tune the details that would get me to my best racing form.  I know not all of the Supertour racers, especially on our team, felt quite so comfortable with racing just yet.

The GRP team as a whole had an up-and-down rollercoaster of a Nationals, with a few bright lights of good results shining through a lot of difficult races and unfulfilling results. (The courses involved a rollercoaster effect too, with long climbs and fast descents, but the emotional/results rollercoaster was probably more extreme…)

Our coaches and wax techs, Pepa, Nick Brown, and Bryan Cook, did an excellent job through the week of reassuring and encouraging everyone, and testing many, many combinations of waxes.  While it would be untrue to say that we had perfect skis every day, and in fact a significant bit of our inconsistency as a team was attributable to wax/ski difficulties, the techs did a great job of working through the problems to make each day better than the previous one.  By the classic sprint heats on the last day, our skis were extremely good.  Thanks techs!

Check out the results post in this blog (http://www.craftsbury.com/blogs/grp/?p=5151 or see 2013-2014 GRP Skiing Results Record on the sidebar) for the breakdown of our results for each day.

For more photos and news articles about the races, check out Fasterskier’s and SkiTrax’s coverage of US Nationals, but here are a few to start:

Caitlin and Liz racing in the 10k classic.

Caitlin and Liz racing in the 10k classic.

Bryan Cook (former GRP skier, now wax tech) runs past the start pen.  Behind the men, including Gordon and Andrew, are lining up for the 15k classic.

Bryan Cook (former GRP skier, now wax tech) runs past the start pen. Behind him, the men, including Gordon and Andrew, are lining up for the 15k classic.

Podium! I think I can safely say that my personal highlight of the week, 3rd place in the 10k classic, was also a team highlight.

Podium! I think I can safely say that my personal highlight of the week, 3rd place in the 10k classic, was also a team highlight.

 

Many clear skies and mountain views in Utah, until it clouded over for the last few days of racing.

Many clear skies and mountain views in Utah, until it clouded over for the last few days of racing.

Pete, Andrew, Pat, and Rosie Brennan played an epic(ly long) game of Catan on one of the off days.  Don't scoff at Settlers of Catan until you've played it, it's a great game and highly entertaining!

Pete, Andrew, Pat, and Rosie Brennan played an epic(ly long) game of Catan on one of the off days. Don’t scoff at Settlers of Catan until you’ve played it, it’s a great game and highly entertaining!

Liz during her skate sprint quarterfinal.  She made it through the semifinals into the B final and finished 9th overall.  Photo by Bert Boyer, http://bertboyer.zenfolio.com

Liz during her skate sprint quarterfinal. She made it through the semifinals into the B final and finished 9th overall. Photo by Bert Boyer, http://bertboyer.zenfolio.com

Skate sprint quarterfinal, Caitlin tucking in behind Jennie Bender, eventual race winner.  Photo by Bert Boyer, http://bertboyer.zenfolio.com

Skate sprint quarterfinal, Caitlin tucking in behind Jennie Bender, eventual race winner. Photo by Bert Boyer, http://bertboyer.zenfolio.com

Entering the finishing stretch during the Skate Sprint final.  Although I was last in the final for 6th place overall, looking at this picture reminds me how close together everyone finished - it was an exciting race!  Photo by Tom Kelly/USSA

Entering the finishing stretch during the Skate Sprint final. Although I was last in the final for 6th place overall, looking at this picture reminds me how close together everyone finished – it was an exciting race! Photo by Tom Kelly/USSA

 

Andrew qualified in the top 30 for the first time at Nationals in the classic sprint this year!  Here he's racing in his quarterfinal.  Photo from Fasterskier.

Andrew qualified in the top 30 for the first time at Nationals in the classic sprint this year! Here he’s racing in his quarterfinal. Photo from Fasterskier.

Alex Shultz racing in the semifinal.  He qualified 12th and ended up 8th after a day of tactically smart skiing.  Photo from Fasterskier.

Alex Shultz racing in a semifinal of the classic sprint. He qualified 12th and ended up 8th after a day of tactically smart skiing. Photo from Fasterskier.