Green Racing Project Blog Header Image
  • Craftsbury Outdoor Center Logo
  • Concept2 SkiErg Logo
  • Caldwell Sport
  • Ibex Outdoor Clothing
  • Podiumwear
  • Rudy Project
  • Sauce Headwear Logo
  • Start Skiwaxes

Archive for May, 2010

Busy, Busy

24.May.2010 by Lauren Jacobs

Life has been plenty busy here in Craftsbury since returning at the end of April. There are gardens plots to prepare and plant, compost sheds to build, and BKL kids to coach. And, of course, plenty of training! Here are a few photos showing what I’ve been up to the last couple weeks.

Hug that post.

Hug that post.

Lauren vs. 6'8'' rower.

Lauren vs. 6'8'' rower.

Need a nail? Just ask Satchel.

Need a nail? Just ask Satchel.

Compost shed. Sponsored by Swix wax.

Compost shed. Sponsored by Swix wax.

Ani taking aim under the watchful eyes of Mike.

Ani taking aim under the watchful eyes of Mike.

IMG_2363

Ethan helping Patrick at the range yesterday.

The first round of planting in the new plot behind the office.

The first round of planting in the new plot behind the office.

IMG_2360

Pepa brought Chelsea and I down to Elmore State Park for a run/hike workout this morning. Our goal was to scope out a potential up-hill running time trial location for the NENSA REG camp that Craftsbury is hosting in June. The road heading up the mountain will be perfect for the time trial, which will end at the remains of an old cabin situated near a little overlook. After the cabin you can keep heading up a short but very steep section of trail and climb the fire tower. It was hot and humid today, but even with a bit of haze the views from the fire tower were wicked good. We had more time to go for our workout so we went down a trail to the “Balancing Rock” and explored the Catamount Trail for a bit. It’s a beautiful spot that we’ll definitely be coming back too. Plus, it’s great to jump in the lake at the end of a long hot run!

Chels at the top of the fire tower on Mt. Elmore.

Chels at the top of the fire tower on Mt. Elmore.

The boys are in Bend, Oregon skiing on snow right now but my big trip of the summer will be a lot closer to home. Starting next Tuesday (June 1) I will be hiking the Appalachian Trail from Katahdin to Caratunk in Maine. It’s 152 miles and includes the “100 Mile Wilderness,” which is generally considered the most remote section of the AT because it doesn’t cross a paved road for 100 miles. I’m doing the trip with my friend Bob, who was a couple years older than me at Gould. Hiking this section of the AT has been on my life list for a long time and I’m really happy that I have a friend crazy enough to do it with me! I’m also grateful that Pepa is okay with the trip. Bob’s hometown is Caratunk (population 40) so it will be cool to walk right over to his Dad’s house at the end of the trek. We’re hoping to average 15 miles a day, with maybe a day of rest (and fly fishing) somewhere in the middle. It will certainly be an adventure and I can’t wait to get started. Undoubtedly, I will bring plenty of stories and photos home with me…if I don’t get carried off by black flies along the way.

The AT in Maine. We're starting at the far northern end with Katahdin and ending at Caratunk on Rte. 201.

The AT in Maine. We're starting at the far northern end with Katahdin and ending at Caratunk on Rte. 201.

In which I don’t hate rollerskiing

23.May.2010 by Chelsea Little

I think everyone’s heard me say quite a few times that I hate rollerskiing. But I’ve come to a realization. I don’t hate rollerskiing! I only hate rollerskiing when I feel tired and crappy. If I feel good, then I love rollerskiing. If I feel okay, then I don’t mind it at all. So maybe this year I can feel tired less of the time, and then I’ll love rollerskiing!

Anyway, we had a tempo workout yesterday and I convinced Pepa to take some pictures. It was a beautiful morning with a small group, just me and Lauren and the college boys.

DSC03159

DSC03160_2

DSC03162

DSC03164_2

Also, yesterday was biathlon day. Ethan and Lauren and Mike shot with Algis, and then we had him help us with BKL practice at the range. BKL culminated in a relay, which Ethan and Lauren took part in. Coming into the final leg, Ethan’s team had a huge lead. So when he was running his loop, Pepa un-zeroed his rifle. It wasn’t enough, though, as he still hit some targets. When he was doing his penalty push-ups, she added another challenge by telling Matthew Lawlor to come sit on his back. Pepa might be the only coach in the history of the world who has told her athletes to do push-ups with other athletes on their backs (hi Tim). I think Matthew was a little confused. It was pretty funny…. and Ethan’s team still won.

DSC03193

Spring!

17.May.2010 by Susan Dunklee

Although it may be blasphemous for me to say this since I am a snow-loving skier, spring is my favorite season.  The world feels like it is waking up.  Critters start to move around more, and everything in nature seems happy to be alive.  I start to see ducks paddling about in half-flooded yards, and woodchucks basking in the sunshine.  Even the inevitable rainstorms and resulting mud are welcome signs for me.  Following a downpour, I can almost watch the plants grow.  The earliest flowers, such as Coltsfoot, emerge alongside melting snow patches, and the budding trees create a verdant carpet inching up the mountainsides day by day.  As spring matures into summer, the Vermont landscape could be described a sponge painting with dabs of every possible shade of green, from yellowy birch to dark pine.

I must admit that I missed a couple of weeks of spring in the northeast to witness the wonders of the west.  I flew out to Colorado to visit fellow biathletes Lanny and Tracy Barnes in their hometown of Durango.  Another biathlete, Andrea Mayo, who trains with the Maine Winter Sports Center, came along too.  The Barnes shared their love of all things outdoors with us, including  fishing, turkey hunting, hiking, hot springs, and mountain biking.  One day we journeyed over to Mesa Verde National Park and toured the ancient cliff dwellings in a snowstorm.  We spend a week camping high on a mountain pass so we could access the snowpack for crust-skiing before the sun softened it midmorning.  When we weren’t busy skiing or biking, we went treasure hunting.  We bushwhacked in search of deer and elk antler sheds, and we walked under the lift lines at Purgatory Mountain Resort looking for goggles, poles, cameras, and iPods dropped by alpine skiers during the winter.  Sometime in the next few years, the Barnes and I dream of unicycling in the famous Iron Horse bike race, which climbs over the 2 passes between Durango and Silverton, CO.   One afternoon, I started my training for this by unicycling up Coal Bank Pass.

Now I’m back in the northeast, ready for another summer of hard training.  I am very excited to be joining the Green Racing Project, and look forward to future adventures in Craftsbury.  Already I’ve been braving the black flies with Lauren while working on the new compost bins and the garden plot.  I’ve been listening to Matt, Ollie and Tim scheming and dreaming about new single-track mountain bike trails.  Pepa has introduced me to the “step test” on the Ski Erg, which can be used to measure VO2 max, as well as other things.  Chelsea’s been kind enough to introduce me to vernal pool that she recently blogged about and all the cool critters she found in it.  There is a lot going on around here and the summer is going to be great!

Our crazy crew in Durango (from L to R, me, Lanny Barnes, Tracy Barnes, and Andrea Mayo, photo courtesy of Lanny)

My first ever broken ski. We spent hours finding jumps in the crusty snow. I guess I shouldn’t have been too surprised when I busted a ski (check out my right ski, behind the foot). Luckily, it was an old beater pair that I’d had for 10 years.

Mesa Verde's Park Ranger Jo shows us Cliff Palace and describes the Ancestral Pueblo Peoples that lived there. They ate wild game, as well as corns beans, and squash farmed on the plateau above, and they found spring water under the cliffs. Very few of the inhabitants survived past age 30- I guess I'd probably be past my prime.

Learning about turkey hunting and trying out the 12-gauge. (Photo: Lanny Barnes)

Who are those turkeys anyway???

Weekend in the Pyrenees!

17.May.2010 by Ida Sargent

This past weekend I decided to head to the Pyrenees to do a little hiking in the mountains.  So I took a train early Friday morning to the little ski town of Ax-les-Thermes, got a map of the hiking trails in the area, and headed off into the mountains.  “Walking season” doesn’t start in the Pyrenees until June so most of the huts were still closed and I had to instead do day hikes and stay in the town.  I soon found out why the summer is better than the spring for hiking as I found lots of snow not that far above town.  The weather also turned out to be not the best hiking weather and I spent a lot of the time especially in the higher elevations in a snowy foggy cloud.  So I can’t say I saw too many of the mountains but I know they are there as I hiked up some pretty steep trails!  Here are a few of the pictures from the weekend.

weekend6Mountains and clouds

The town of Ax-les-Thermes

The town of Ax-les-Thermes

Lots of snow!

Lots of snow!Hot sp;ring baths in the center of town!

Hot spring baths in the middle of town!

weekend8weekend9weekend10Ummm....

Ummm....